News Releases

News Releases 2016-11-14T23:08:31+00:00
25Apr

Spring Weather Outlook

April 25th, 2017|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Mick Kjar, Meteorologist

At the end of April now as we stare at the radar and thermometer in hopes of some warm, dry weather for a few fleeting hours of fieldwork … we hear of significant rains the last week of April and early May for the major corn producing states from Nebraska eastward between I-70 north to I-90 and 94 all the way to Pennsylvania!

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20Apr

Starter Fertilizer at Corn Planting

April 20th, 2017|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Grant Mehring,NDCUC Contracted Research Director

I mentioned last week that the second aspect of the fertility regimen corn farmers are face with that I wanted to discuss before plant 2017 really commenced was starter fertility. There is no quicker way to get a room full of corn producers active in conversation than to bring up the topic of starter fertility in corn. It is a widely-accepted and used production practice in the northern corn belt as a tool to manage planting corn early, or in cool and wet soil conditions as so often happens here in the North.

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13Apr

Nitrogen Fertility in Corn Production

April 13th, 2017|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Grant Mehring,NDCUC Contracted Research Director

As plant 2017 is nearing some parts of North Dakota, I am continuing to cover some pre-plant decisions that are being made. For at least the next two articles I want to discuss fertility. There is quite a lot to maintaining proper fertility for corn as the crop is a high user of many nutrients, so I will not be discussing all pertinent nutrients or aspects of the nutrients discussed. This week I want to focus on the nutrient we hear and talk most about in corn – Nitrogen (N).

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5Apr

Planting Dates in Corn Production

April 5th, 2017|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Grant Mehring,NDCUC Contracted Research Director

What is the earliest and latest you have ever planted corn on your farm, or that producers that you work with have planted? I encourage you to think about this as plant 2017 nears. Planting dates in corn production are critical for reaching maximum yield and optimum harvest moisture of a corn crop. Given that corn is a heat and growing degree day driven crop, it makes sense that planting date can have such an impact on yield and moisture. I want to cover a few things relating to planting date as field season nears.

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22Mar

Choosing the Right Corn Hybrids

March 22nd, 2017|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Grant Mehring,NDCUC Contracted Research Director

Choosing the correct corn hybrid(s) for your farm is the easiest way to gain (or lose) bushels, given you have already optimized most other management practices. In a North Dakota hybrid trial data set from NDSU, there was as much as 88 bushels per acre difference between the top and bottom yielding adapted hybrids at a location, and all hybrids entered were available for seed in that or the following year. If you do the quick math in your head you can quickly see how much choosing the right hybrid impacts profitability at the farm level. (more…)

31Oct

Corn Drying and Storage Issues

October 31st, 2016|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Grant Mehring,NDCUC Contracted Research Director

There is cause for excitement when talking about corn today in North Dakota. We are experiencing what will likely be a state record yield by several bushels per acre, with generally great harvest conditions. In the week ending October 23, 2016, according to USDA crop progress data, we are 39% harvested with corn in North Dakota, behind last year’s pace by 17%. This is very nice progress, however, there are a few issues that have become prominent in the past week that I want to address, namely corn drydown and storage issues.

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15Sep

Corn Dry Down

September 15th, 2016|Categories: "Corn: Technically Speaking" Blog|

By Grant Mehring,NDCUC Contracted Research Director

Black layer is upon or nearing our corn fields throughout North Dakota. Black layer is the physiological indicator at the tip of a corn kernel where the kernel was previously connected to the nutrient and moisture flow of the corn plant. Black layer forms when the hard starch layer has moved to the base of the kernel, and is when the maximum amount of dry weight has accumulated in the kernel.

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