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So far North Dakota Corn has created 115 blog entries.
10 Mar

Get To Know Your Council Members:

2020-03-10T13:11:01-05:00March 10th, 2020|North Dakota Corn Utilization Council|

District 3: Bill Wagner, Neche, ND

North Dakota is divided into seven districts.  These districts elect a member to serve producers on the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council. William Wagner of Neche, ND represents those producers in District 3. District 3 is comprised of Williams, Divide, Burke, Mountrail, Ward, Renville, Bottineau, McHenry, Rolette, Pierce, Benson, Towner, Cavalier, Ramsey, Pembina, Walsh, Nelson and Grand Forks Counties.

(more…)

25 Feb

NDCGA Seeks Director of Public Policy

2020-02-25T15:08:36-06:00February 25th, 2020|General Information, News Releases, North Dakota Corn Growers Association|

Director of Public Policy for the North Dakota Corn Growers Association

Position Purpose: Work with board of directors to develop and implement programs that enhance the profitability of ND farms. Work with corn grower and council staff to put on programs and events that enhance the professional development of the directors of each organization. Disseminate information affecting North Dakota corn growers to the board of directors. Ensure the continued growth and viability of the Association by actively seeking opportunities to increase membership and identifying potential ongoing sources of revenue. Advocate for the North Dakota corn industry with national and state policy leaders. Liaison to the National Corn Growers Association on behalf of the Association and the North Dakota corn industry.

Oversee the effective operation of the Association: Assist in fundraising activities including an annual golf tournament, trade show and other sponsored events. Work with partners during legislative session to provide opportunities for legislative interaction. Present policy report at quarterly meetings and at the annual meeting of all members. Support the Board of Directors including organizing and scheduling meetings. Communicate with the Board of Directors on activities of staff, state and national policy issues and efforts at the National Corn Growers Association.

State and National Policy: Serve as a resource for board and membership on all state and national policy issues affecting the corn industry. Engage on all issues affecting the corn industry at the state legislature. Work with NDCGA state lobbyist to develop strategy as issues arise. Activate the board of directors when issues affecting the corn industry are brought before the legislature. Attend necessary hearing and meetings at the state capitol. Serve as North Dakota representative to the National Corn Growers Association. Engage on all national issues affecting the North Dakota corn industry. Communicate to Board of Directors, ND Corn Utilization Council and membership if necessary, on national issues affecting North Dakota. Work with Washington D.C. lobbyist to keep board of directors appraised of potential national issues affecting the ND corn industry. Develop strategies with the Board of Directors to resolve national issues.

Membership and Corporate Sponsorship: Assist in the development and help execute a plan to ensure that the NDCGA meets or exceed its membership goals. Respond to member inquiries and serve as a general resource for members. Distribute relative communications to the general membership and media as necessary. Build relationships with industry sponsors to obtain additional sources of revenue.

Public Relations: Promote good relations between the Association and its constituents. Be active and visible in state and national organizations as directed by the Board of Directors. Serve as the Association representative to state and national organizations including the National Corn Growers Association or as directed by the Board of Directors. Together, with the Board of Directors serve as a spokesperson for the Association to the news media. Attend scheduled meetings of the National Corn Growers Association and communicate national issues to the boards of both NDCGA and the ND Corn Utilization Council.

Board of Directors Support: Assist in organizing and scheduling Board of Directors meetings as directed by the President. Notify and prepare agenda for Board of Directors meetings. Keep executive committee and board of directors informed of conditions and operations of the Association. Participate with the executive committee and the board of directors in developing Association policies. Suggest needed policies to officers to ensure a sound organizational structure. Compile and update Association handbook and distribute to all members of the Board of Directors.

Activities and Events: Plan and organize fundraising, membership and legislative events taking place throughout the year. Suggest additional events to help the Association build relationships and meet its membership and revenue goals.

Financial Management: Work with the Executive Director of the ND Corn Utilization Council and other sponsors to develop and execute advertising and leadership training agreements.

All other duties as assigned by the North Dakota Corn Growers Association Board of Directors.

 

Please submit resume, cover letter and three references to Elli Ressler 4852 Rocking Horse Circle S., Fargo, ND 58104 or email .

Resumes will be accepted until the close of business on March 13, 2020.

Salary commensurate with experience.

7 Feb

2019 NDCUC Annual Report

2020-02-13T11:11:36-06:00February 7th, 2020|North Dakota Corn Utilization Council|

The North Dakota Corn Utilization Council publishes an annual report and year in review at the end of each fiscal year. To receive a free copy of a report, or to sign up for future free publications from the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council please send a note to  or call 701-566-9322.

View the 2019 Annual Report online below. (more…)

27 Jan

Why Should I Attend the Northern Corn and Soybean Expo?

2020-01-28T08:50:42-06:00January 27th, 2020|News Releases, North Dakota Corn Growers Association, North Dakota Corn Utilization Council|

The Expo is a full day of FREE events designed to make you a better producer, all under one roof – the Fargodome. The Expo features informative breakout sessions on current issues affecting your operation, nationally-acclaimed speakers covering important topics and a trade show featuring companies showcasing emerging technologies and products. You will have the opportunity to network with your peers and industry experts at these sessions and during a provided breakfast and lunch. Read on to discover just what Expo has to offer you! (more…)

22 Jan

NDSU Extension Explains Natural-air Drying Concepts, Busts Myths

2020-01-23T08:31:45-06:00January 22nd, 2020|News Releases, North Dakota Corn Utilization Council|

NDSU Extension’s grain drying expert offers advice on drying crops.

The moisture content and temperature of grain play a big role in how long that grain can be stored without significant deterioration.

Air drying is one way to reduce the moisture in grain. However, natural-air drying is not effective during the winter, according to Ken Hellevang, North Dakota State University Extension agricultural engineer and grain drying expert. The cold air does not hold enough moisture to accomplish in-bin drying. (more…)

10 Jan

NDCUC Funds Research Projects for 2021 Fiscal Year

2020-01-10T15:06:11-06:00January 10th, 2020|News Releases, North Dakota Corn Utilization Council|

The North Dakota Corn Utilization Council (NDCUC) members approved funding for 25 research projects in the 2021 fiscal year at their annual Research Summit on December 3, 2019. These projects will be completed by researchers from North Dakota State University (NDSU), and the University of North Dakota (UND). The projects approved for funding are: (more…)

20 Dec

NDCGA VP Paul Thomas shares his thoughts on the EPA RVO rule

2019-12-20T11:06:06-06:00December 20th, 2019|General Information, News Releases, North Dakota Corn Growers Association|

North Dakota Corn Growers Association Vice President Paul Thomas of Velva, ND shared his thoughts with Mick Kjar about the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Renewable Volume Obligations’s (RVO) rule. This ruling set the fuel volume requirements for the coming year, including accounting for 2020 refinery waivers. Listen to Paul’s full interview here or click the box below. 

3 Dec

Many Factors Influence Corn Test Weight

2019-12-03T07:44:48-06:00December 3rd, 2019|General Information, News Releases, North Dakota Corn Utilization Council|

by Dr. Kenneth J. Hellevang; NDSU Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Poor growing and harvesting conditions this year have North Dakota producers concerned about the test weight of their corn.

“Many factors influence the measured test weight of corn, including the physical characteristics of the kernel such as size, density, shape and surface of the kernel,” says Ken Hellevang, North Dakota State University Extension agricultural engineer. (more…)

27 Nov

2019 Corn Harvest – Frequently Asked Questions

2019-11-27T11:08:29-06:00November 27th, 2019|News Releases, North Dakota Corn Growers Association|

Q: What should the insured do if there are unharvested acres of corn at the calendar date for the end of insurance period (EOIP), which is September 30th for silage and December 10th for grain?

A: File a timely notice of loss with their crop insurance agent for any damage due to an insurable cause of loss on or before the calendar date for the EOIP for all unharvested corn, which may result in the following determination(s) by Approved Insurance Providers (AIP) in accordance with the Risk Management Agency’s (RMA) procedures:

  • AIPs may authorize policyholders, on a case-by-case basis, more time to attempt to harvest the crop so claims can be settled based on harvested production in accordance with subparagraph 702B of the Loss Adjustment Manual Standards Handbook (LAM). An AIP may allow additional time to harvest when the following conditions are met:
    • The insured provides a timely notice of loss to their crop insurance agent;
    • The AIP determines and documents that the delay in harvest was due to an insured cause of loss;
    • The insured demonstrates that harvest was not possible due to insured causes; and
    • The delay in harvest was not because the insured did not have sufficient equipment or manpower to harvest the crop by the EOIP.
  • AIPs may make final inspections in accordance with paragraph 702 of the AIPs will account for all insured acres of the crop that were harvested or unharvested and appraised. This will include applying quality adjustment as outlined in the Coarse Grains Crop Provisions (CP), applicable State/County Special Provisions, and the Corn Loss Adjustment Standards Handbook.
  • AIPs may require the insured to leave representative sample areas in accordance with paragraph 924 of the Representative sample areas are used when deferred appraisals (subparagraph 921B of the LAM) are required and the insured requests immediate release of the acreage.
  • AIPs may settle claims based on the appraisal from the remaining unharvested acres. Follow LAM procedure regarding final disposition of a crop.

 

Q: Can an insured harvest past the calendar date for the EOIP?

A: Yes. The AIP may authorize additional time to complete loss adjustment due to an insured peril preventing harvest by the calendar date for the EOIP, including additional time to harvest the crop on a case-by-case basis, as explained above.

 

Q: Is the insured required to harvest all corn acreage in order for the AIP to complete the claim?

A: No, AIPs may complete a claim based on an appraisal of unharvested acreage in accordance with subparagraph 921A of the LAM.

 

Q: What if an insured cannot mechanically harvest the crop acreage due to an insurable cause of loss?

A: Subparagraph 921D of the LAM includes procedure for determining unable to mechanically harvest. No production will be counted for acreage that is determined unable to mechanically harvest. If mechanical harvest is feasible with normal harvest methods/equipment on any portion of the unharvested acreage, the AIP can appraise and count only the production that could have been mechanically harvested. Wet field conditions, snow covered fields, or inaccessible roads/bridges that prevent harvest of the crop by the calendar date for the EOIP does not mean the acreage can never be mechanically harvested with normal harvest methods/equipment. This may only be a temporary condition. Likewise, the fact that it would cost more to harvest the crop than the crop is worth does not constitute that the insured is unable to mechanically harvest the crop.

 

Q: Can AIPs use harvested production from representative sample areas for appraised production and to obtain samples for quality adjustment determinations?

A: Yes, subparagraph 921C of the LAM allows for harvested representative sample appraisals.

 

Q: If the acreage is appraised (vs. harvested) and put to another use, what effect is there on the Actual Production History (APH) database?

A: Refer to subparagraph 1304E of the Crop Insurance Handbook FCIC-18010. For any unharvested acreage, appraised potential production is included on the production report and used in the APH database. If acreage of the crop was destroyed/put to another use and an appraisal of the potential production was not made (not requested for APH database purposes or no claim), the production report will indicate the planted acres and a “zero” yield.

 

Q: Does quality adjustment include discounts for the moisture content of corn grain?

A: There are no quality discounts for moisture content. If moisture adjustment is applicable, it will be made prior to any adjustment for quality in accordance with section 11(d) of the Coarse Grains CP. Section 11(d) of the Coarse Grains CP specifies that corn production to count will be reduced by 0.12 percent for each 0.1 percentage point of moisture in excess of fifteen percent (15%), and if moisture exceeds thirty percent (30%), production will be reduced by 0.2 percent for each 0.1 percentage point of moisture in excess of thirty percent (30%).

 

Q: If corn grain has a test weight of 44.00 to 48.99 (on the discount factor chart in Section A of the Special Provisions) with no other eligible quality discounts, can the quality discount be determined by a reduction in value (RIV) if the corn grain is sold?

A: In accordance with the Special Provisions, the quality discount is determined by the discount factor chart in Section A of the Special Provisions for the applicable county and a RIV discount is not an option. See the following example test weight discount factor chart for reference:

 

Q: An insured’s corn grain production is damaged due to an insurable cause of loss and the production is rejected by the elevator/buyer due to low test weight. Is the damaged corn grain production eligible for an indemnity when there is no buyer for the production?

A: Every reasonable effort should be made by the insured and the AIP to find a market for the damaged corn grain production including:

  • A determination if there are buyers outside of the local marketing area;
  • Determination if livestock feeding operations or other types of salvage buyers are willing to buy the damaged production; and
  • Fair consideration to deliver production to a market outside the insureds local marketing area (distant market) is equal to or greater than the production’s value at the distant market.

If a market still cannot be found for the damaged production, the AIP can make zero market value determinations in accordance with subparagraph 1102H of the LAM. A zero market value determination by the AIP will result in zero production to count for claims purposes, if the production is destroyed in an acceptable manner.

 

Q: Does zero market value procedure in the Special Provisions apply if the corn grain test weight is on the discount factor chart in Section A (44.00 through 48.99) and no viable salvage market can be found?

A: Zero market value procedure applies if the AIP determines there are insured quality deficiencies and there is no salvage market. However, if the corn grain test weight is 49.00 and above (having no insured quality deficiencies), then zero market value procedure would not be applicable.

 

Q: If the AIP determines there is zero market value production due to insured quality deficiencies, does the production have to be destroyed?

A: Production must be destroyed in an acceptable manner in order to receive the discount factor of 1.000 (zero production to count for claim purposes). If production is not destroyed, discount factors will be determined in accordance with Section D of the Special Provisions.

 

Q: Are there specific quality adjustment procedures when the edible portion of a crop is exposed to flood waters?

A: In accordance with Section C of the Special Provisions, if the edible portion of a crop is exposed to flood waters it is considered adulterated and should not be used for feed and food:

 

“The Food and Drug Administration guidelines state when an edible portion of a crop is exposed to flood waters, it is considered adulterated and can be injurious to human or animal health and should not be used for feed or food.  For acreage of an insured crop in which the edible portion of the crop has been exposed to flood waters, such production is considered to contain substances or conditions qualifying under Section C3 with a level exceeding the maximum amount allowed.  Such production is not required to be sampled and tested by an approved laboratory.  Whether you intend to harvest or not harvest such acreage, you must give us notice to inspect the crop.  Such production will be considered to have zero market value if destroyed in an acceptable manner.  Refer to Section D.  If you harvest production from such flood-damaged acreage and commingle with production from acreage not damaged by flood, such commingled production will not be adjusted for any quality deficiencies listed in Section C.”